Teachers, employers and parents want to see younger people reach their potential, however the problem is that the pathway to productivity and living a life of high capacity and great quality is not a straight line for Gen Y and Gen Z’s. In an era of increasing change, greater complexity and global mega-trends these younger generations need mentors to grow them, guide them and give them the feedback they need to develop and mature.

At McCrindle we know these younger generations and we believe in their potential to achieve greatness. Managers, CEO’s, team leaders, teachers and parents have a unique opportunity to mentor these younger generations through formal and informal conversations. Gen Y and Z’s are keen be mentored. That means they want to be listened to, not lectured at, encouraged and asked open-ended questions that help their decision making process.

The goal of mentoring young people is to expand their values and worldview, strengthen their character and enlarge their personal and professional capacity. These younger generations desire opportunities for personal growth through a friendly and supportive partnership.

Mentors and leaders in society today have an opportunity to shape these younger generations. The challenge mentors often face is around how to turn general conversations into character and skill development.

7 Developmental Areas mentors need to cover

PRIORITIES: Help these generations focus amongst digital distractions

RESILIENCE: Highlight their current experience and strengths to provide assurance in anxious moments

AUTHENTICITY: Showcase the benefits of community in and above digital connectivity

INSIGHT: Provide greater vision to make wise life decisions

ENERGY: Encourage decisiveness to remove blockers, overcome obstacles and move forward

BALANCE: Teach them how to say a positive ‘no’ in a busy ‘yes’ work/life culture, to maintain a healthy lifestyle

GREATNESS: Inspire the best in these young people as they move through the transitional stages of life.

Geoff Brailey speaking on this topic at the Australian Communities Forum 2016

Understanding the next generation of volunteers and donors

A specific area of focus in the 2016 Australian Communities Report is analysis of volunteers and supporters aged under 30 and in this session, Geoff Brailey, Research Executive at McCrindle Research, will share the findings as well as give practical insights on engaging young people in community organisations and developing the leadership capacity of the next generation of staff and volunteers.

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